Congratulation, Heather Lee!

Heather Lee, a Ph.D. student in Geography, has been awarded the Texas A&M University Dissertation Fellowship to support the writing phase of her doctoral dissertation!  Heather’s project, supported by grants from the National Science Foundation DDRI (with Jepson) program and the Glasscock Center (TAMU), examines water governance and the adoption of conservation technologies for irrigation in Mexico.

AAG 2015 Chicago – Session Updates

Fast/Slow States: Time-Space, Technology, and Water Governance

Here is our line-up of papers, discussants, and panelists for the AAG Annual Meeting in Chicago. The papers represent a full range of approaches to water governance and time-space across the globe. We have two paper sessions and a panel discussion.

Paper panel 1: Cecilia Roa (UBC), Jessica Barnes (South Carolina), Jessica Budds (East Anglia, Chair); Trevor Birkenholtz (Illinois), and Wendy Jepson (TAMU, Discussant)

Paper panel 2: Emma Norman (Northwest Tribal College), Adam Mandelman(UW-Madison), Wendy Jepson (TAMU) , Eric Perramond (Colorado College), and Tom Perreault (Syracuse, Discussant)

Panel session: Wendy Jepson (TAMU), Rebecca Lave (Indiana), Katie Meehan (Oregon), Kathryn Furlong (Montreal), Eric Perramond (Colorado College)

Session Abstract. Current research on water governance examines how nation-states and sub-national institutions map, quantify, and territorialize waters at various scales. Recent work in STS and political ecology interrogates the role of  technology in both hard and soft path regimes of water governance.  The sessions further this line of inquiry by engaging the larger question of how time, broadly speaking the time-space of the waterscape, comes into play.  How do technologies, defined as system of practices, knowledge and devices, reconstitute the hydro-social cycle through the co-production of time. How do expertise, technology, and practices manipulate water resources as they flow simultaneously through space and time – how fast or slow water flows move, who controls the speed of flow, how does time redefine water itself, and what are the implications for water governance, access, and equity? How does state governance reflect or ignore time-space dimensions of water flow?  We encourage papers that draw examples from the Global North and Global South because we argue that all forms of state-authorized governance depend on water expertise and technology in abetting the flow of water.  Panelists will address the time-space of hydro-social relationships from the angles of environmental history, STS, political ecology, and critical legal frameworks, and highlight the implications.

Co-organizing AAG Sessions for Chicago, April 2015

Thanks to Eric Perramond’s (Colorado College) initial ping, we have organized a three-part set of sessions for the next AAG Annual Meeting in Chicago. We have a fantastic line up of scholars –both early career, and those of us who are, well, not so early career– to push existing analytics in water governance to incorporate the question of time and time/space.  Below is the précis, and I will post the participants and titles as they come rolling in.  We have two full paper sessions and one session dedicated to debate and discussion.  I am so grateful for the collegial response of our participants and discussants. To quote Eric, “Onward!”

Fast/Slow States: Time-Space, Technology, and Water Governance

Current research on water governance examines how nation-states and sub-national institutions map, quantify, and territorialize waters at various scales. Recent work in STS and political ecology interrogates the role of  technology in both hard and soft path regimes of water governance.  The sessions further this line of inquiry by engaging the larger question of how time, broadly speaking the time-space of the waterscape, comes into play.  How do technologies, defined as system of practices, knowledge and devices, reconstitute the hydro-social cycle through the co-production of time. How do expertise, technology, and practices manipulate water resources as they flow simultaneously through space and time – how fast or slow water flows move, who controls the speed of flow, how does time redefine water itself, and what are the implications for water governance, access, and equity? How does state governance reflect or ignore time-space dimensions of water flow?  We encourage papers that draw examples from the Global North and Global South because we argue that all forms of state-authorized governance depend on water expertise and technology in abetting the flow of water.  Panelists will address the time-space of hydro-social relationships from the angles of environmental history, STS, political ecology, and critical legal frameworks, and highlight the implications.

Society of Women Geographers Awards Swetha Peteru Prestigious Pruitt Fellowship

Society of Women Geographers has awarded Swetha Peteru, one of my doctoral candidates and Applied Biodiversity Science Associates, the prestigious Pruitt Fellowship for her dissertation research.  Swetha’s doctoral research examines how tropical agroforestry regimes create divergent biotic landscapes, looking at both plant species and genetic diversity.  Her cutting-edge work ties human activity to genetic diversity by her novel integration of mixed methods in social science, biogeography, and landscape genetics. Her study requires interviews, mapping as well as the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze the relationship between agroforestry practices and biodiversity outcomes. Her work tests the long-claimed but difficulty to verify benefits of agroforestry as a viable conservation with development model.

Swetha investigates how agroforesty reshapes landscapes at the genetic level in the Chanchamayo province of Junin, Peru.  She will be spending the fall semester in the field collecting the last data required so that she can begin writing the dissertation.

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Highland Amazonian forests near the Chanchamayo River.

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Texas Tribune – Drinking Water Systems Draw Federal Concerns

Thanks, Neena, for the great reporting!

Texas RioGrande Legal Aid Newsroom

More than 310 public drinking water systems in Texas — nearly 4.5 percent of the state’s regulated public water systems — have quality issues that haven’t been adequately addressed, federal officials told the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality this year. That is the highest percentage in the nation, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

To read the entire article, click here.

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The ache of injustice

Observations from Emily Vandewalle, a graduate student who just completed her MS in Geography and now is off to the Philippines to work with a water NGO.

Environmental Justice - Texas

I peered deep into the 50 gallon plastic container at the few inches of water remaining at the bottom. Just moments before, the bucket was full- but after 20 minutes of using this water to pressure wash the inside of the 2500 gal water tank that provides water for the Ramirez* home, my plastic container was practically empty. I began to drag the container to the open field just behind the home to dump out the remaining water in attempt to begin the clean-up process after a day full of manual labor, frantic trips to the hardware store, sunburn, sore muscles, and homemade tamales. Just then, Mara*, the female head of the household, walked outside of her home and it dawned on me – maybe she wants to save this water. Upon asking, she hurriedly brought me a 5 gallon open bucket to pour the remaining water from my container into, to be saved for later use in the home- perhaps to fill…

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Texas Colonias: Red Tape or Politics as Barrier to Decent Housing?

Environmental Justice - Texas

Last summer The Texas Tribune published a two-part series on Texas colonias. The first article addresses the efforts and problems with securing habitable dwellings for residents (Red-Tape, Catch-22 Impede Progress). The second article (Conditions, Health Risks Sicken Colonias Residents) paints a striking picture of colonias residents and their life-world. I would only have added that when you enter Mexico Chiquito, the community cited in the article, you are welcomed by a severe sulfur smell that, for the first-time visitor, may cause your eyes to water…but that is another post.

As I finished reading the two articles, I am left unsatisfied. The article relied on the narrative that poor housing and substandard infrastructure are a result of individual actors, “unscrupulous developers,” usurious lenders, and other malcontents ready to prey on poor farm workers. Tone and word choice rendered residents as naturally poor, eliding their existence to the…

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‘If no gasoline, no water’: the rise of water vending machines in South Texas

IMG_0699Rather than drink tap water delivered through community water systems, thousands of families living in south Texas “colonias,” low-income peri-urban and rural subdivisions on the US-Mexico border, rely on private water vending machines.  My recent study discovered that over 87% of the surveyed colonias households relied on 50% or more of drinking water from the water vending machines, colloquially known as the molinto (little windmill). Some may argue that the water vending machine is an engineering success. Who could argue with a point-distribution system that purified water? I suggest otherwise: the ubiquitous water vending machine in South Texas symbolizes a failure of public water systems to provide adequately clean water for the larger community.

Water vending machines fill a demand: residents don’t trust the quality of water from the tap.  It smells, looks funny, or tastes dirty.  It is unreliable: water pressure problems and boil-alerts surprise residents. Others experience skin rashes after showers or baths, and many are concerned that the tap water causes illness. The region’s less than stellar history of domestic drinking water provision and fragmented system of water conveyance –moving water from the Rio Grande through irrigation district conveyance systems into water facilities–  also undermine residents’ trust in source quality.

Water vending machine in Hidalgo County (Jepson 2011)

Water vending machine in Hidalgo County (Jepson 2011)

But the water vending machine as a quick-fix to long-standing water quality problems in the region costs a lot.  It costs the most impoverished households to pay more money for water. Water is universally unaffordable, defined as 2.5% monthly income, and reliance on vended water exacerbates the problem. In addition, over 50% of surveyed households reported that they either missed a water payment or lacked money to pay for their water at some time in the last year.

Accessing drinking water from a vending machine also costs in terms of time and effort. Reliance on water machines requires residents to convey their drinking water in heavy five-gallon bottles from distribution machines to their homes. It is not surprising, then, that over 37% of surveyed household reported difficulty transporting drinking water.  For some, especially the elderly, it was a physical burden; for others, it required gas money. Colonias residents made the connection between transportation and water: “Si no hay gas, no hay agua” (if no gasoline, no water).  In short, drinking water is effectively privatized through the water vending machine by shifting access, conveyance, and responsibility for acceptable drinking water from a regulated community system to the unregulated market and individual.

Privatizing water in this way is not only a costly burden on the poorest households; it a potential public health risk.  Water vending machines are de facto unregulated.  We can only speculate on the health implications of such an overwhelming reliance on drinking water from vending machines.

How does the everyday reliance on vended water impact health? With little or no regulation one wonders what contamination occurs at the point of distribution.  Regulators assume that water from the municipal or community system, which is purified in the machine, remains the same throughout the system.  Yet studies have demonstrated post-treated water often contains pathogenic organisms or fungi at the tap. Some companies may be better than others in developing disinfecting methods at point of distribution, but there is not standard monitored by the state or county. Regardless, water vendors expect colonias residents, many of whom are the working poor and live at or below the poverty level, to maintain and store their bottles properly to avoid water contamination. Instructions on each vending machine stipulate that consumers need to disinfect their bottles prior to refill. Yet, few disinfect the water bottle before reuse, leading to concerns over water contamination. And what about long-term dental health? A recent study by the Texas A&M Baylor School of Dentistry cited bottled water as a culprit that keeps residents from maximizing fluoride’s remineralizing effects. Residents and their families are further deprived of fluoride as well as the other minerals in tap water, further compounding the burden of poverty on health.

IMG_0260In the final analysis, reliance on water vending machines for drinking water places a huge burden on the poorest and most vulnerable communities.  The cost of water is not only beyond affordability (or 2.5% monthly income), and it requires households with limited means to expend time and effort to secure drinking water. Public heath outcomes are unknown, but could be important to assess.  Water vending machines don’t fix the underlying problems of domestic water provision for America’s poor. Instead, these machines lock residents and their families into a no-win waterscape where domestic water provision is insecure.

-Wendy Jepson

Marketing event for water vending machines near colonias

Marketing event for water vending machines near colonias

Full article: Jepson, W., & Brown, H. L. (2014). ‘If no gasoline, no water’: privatizing drinking water quality in South Texas colonias. Environment and Planning A, 46(5), 1032-1048.

Congratulations Audrey and Heather!

I am pleased to announce that Audrey Joslin, a recipient of the NSF DDRI award, also accepted the Texas A&M University Dissertation Year fellowship to complete her doctorate by August 2015!

Heather Lee also heard that her project on the water soft path in Central Mexico is to be recommended for funding through the NSF DDRI competition.

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